Make good art

Photography is an art, we may sometimes forget this caught up in the technical whirl wind of new gadgets and cameras with more giggly watts. But the purpose, to make a beautiful soul striking image, comes from recognizing and utilizing it as an art form. 

Is it a constant battle to continue bettering your art, to remain satisfied and true to what you're trying to achieve? Watching this video might just be what you need. Neil Gainman gives a university commencement speech dealing out nuggets of advice aimed to arm you better for your artistic battle. I felt inspired by his words and I hope you feel the same.

For those of you that don’t have 20 minutes spare, I have extracted a few ideas from the video that I feel are the most interesting.

 

Have a clear goal and make decisions that put you closer to achieving it.

Having your ultimate goal clear in your mind will make all those fork in the road decisions easier and more effective. Win win!

Failure is expected and you must be thick skinned to deal with it.

Failure can flick our off switch if we let it. It’s important to know that professionals deal with it in a constructive way and continue on their artistic journey.

Do work your proud of. If you don't get the money at least you have the work.

Why else would you shoot? Even if it’s a paid job, your work will be better if you are driven to make something you are proud of.

Make your own art.

Because only you can. This resonates with “if you don’t know it’s impossible, it’s easier to do”. I have found that trying too hard to style my images like another photographer makes be blind to the possibilities around me. The bounds of my impossible are tightened and as a result my images suffer.

 

What did you take from the video? Share with us in the comments below. 

 

Until next time,

Alexander Roe

EEOR avalanche control walk through

After missing the chance to capture the control on Canmore's East End of Rundle a few month ago I was keen to have another chance. The road closure notice (posted on fb) was from 1-5pm so I set my camera up at 1 and ran the interval timer* to shoot every 15 seconds.

*Some cameras have a built in interval timer, if not a cheap plug in unit can be bought for cheap on ebay. Interval time was based on available storage to allow the camera to run unsupervised.

*Some cameras have a built in interval timer, if not a cheap plug in unit can be bought for cheap on ebay. Interval time was based on available storage to allow the camera to run unsupervised.

I imported the RAW sequence into Lightroom, rated my selections and then turned on my filter. At this point other files can be deleted.

In the develop module I did manual spot removal because I was stupid and didn't clean my lens :P. I did some tone adjustments, removed sharpening, did a little bit of noise reduction then synced all the images.

Visualise Spots can be very useful when dealing with a lot of blemishes. 

Visualise Spots can be very useful when dealing with a lot of blemishes. 

I plan to use high pass sharpening in Photoshop so LR sharpening is disabled. I adjust noise reduction by eye.

I plan to use high pass sharpening in Photoshop so LR sharpening is disabled. I adjust noise reduction by eye.

The photos are exported as layers to Photoshop.

 I follow a method for blending similar to that used in the start of this video. I like to do my image adjustments in LR to reduce the PS work.

The layers are then merged, note that once the layers are merged you will no longer be able to adjust masks. This is done to reduce file size. Then I sharpen with a technique similar to this. Set at 1px.

Save and go back to LR. The new image will be there. Metadata is added and I export out of lightroom. Disable the .jpg sharpening in the export settings.

Click image to view at 100%!

Click image to view at 100%!